PENUMBRA 

ART EXHIBITION

Spring 2022

Welcome to the virtual art exhibit for the 32nd edition of Stanislaus State University's literary and art journal, Penumbra. Before 2020, Penumbra allowed artists, poets, and writers alike to gather at our journal launch and admire artists' contributions in person at the end of the university's spring term. Due to the pandemic, however, Penumbra has had to improvise; now we curate and showcase the Spring's art on an online platform for viewers' convenience. Below you will find this spring's artists, our book cover, our art winner piece, and the rest of the art pieces featured in the journal. We hope you enjoy this Spring's edition of Penumbra

 
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WELCOME TO PENUMBRA

About Us

Penumbra is Stanislaus State University's literary and art journal, housed in the department of English and run by undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in English 4019: Editing Literary Magazines, offered every Spring semester. Penumbra has been publishing high-quality literature and art since 1989. In 2020, Penumbra launched Penumbra Online, a virtual edition of our journal, which publishes in the summer and fall. To see more, go to www.penumbraonline.org.


The following is a compilation of this year's featured artists as well as their artworks. Special thanks to the Penumbra Virtual Art Exhibition team, Andrea Wagner and Vanessa Valencia, for curating this year's exhibit!


You will find links to previous versions of Penumbra below. Thank you for your patience and continued support! 


Find our 2021 edition here: 

https://www.csustan.edu/sites/default/files/groups/Penumbra/documents/penumbra_2021_-_final_draft_-_end_copy.pdf
Find our 2020 edition here:

https://issuu.com/csustanislaus/docs/penumbra_2020

 

MEET THE ARTISTS

 
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Dottie is an artist and writer from California; she received her BFA in Pictorial Art from San Jose State University. She thinks it’s pretty weird to exist at all, so she paints and draws and writes about it. She loves animals, strawberries, and overcast days. Her work can be found online at dottielobue.com.

Dottie Lo Bue

BOOK COVER

Dream Bird

Oil on Canvas

by Dottie Lo Bue

The artist did not wish to include a description for their piece.

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ART WINNER

Light Music 12

Photography

by Roger Camp

"The inspiration for 'Light Music 12' came from a childhood job I had in my parent's hardware store. It was from emptying out a large box of glass strips that were leftovers from sizing and cutting window glass. I was intrigued by how the sunlight refracted off of the multiple surfaces. Remembering that as an adult I went to the local hardware store and yes, they a trash box of glass shards and I was welcome to all of it! In a skylight lit studio, I used an industrial prism mounted on a tripod as a light source, projecting the band of prismatic light onto glass strips. This led me to glass pyrex rods, which are the primary subject matter of "Light Music 12." The original image was shot with Kodachrome 25 film and later scanned into a digital file. The colors and light are all natural and there has been no digital alteration."


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ART SUBMISSIONS

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PENUMBRA

BY AMY YOUNG

Oil on Canvas

"One of the pieces in a series called Flying Lessons, "Penumbra" began as a collage that I later turned into an oil painting.  This piece focuses on the ambivalence of landing, the final phase of flight. The vibrant colors in the painting are indicative of the anticipation of outstretched wings and ethereal choreography, and the darker colors and less-distinguished forms mirror the perils and uncertainties of touching down.  Finally, the preservation of the nature of the collage emphasizes shifting orientations, torn edges, and the constantly changing environments we negotiate as we search for ground."

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OBELISK IN MARBLEHEAD

BY BEVERLY ROSE JOYCE

Acrylic on Canvas

"I painted 'Obelisk in Marblehead' in the weeks following my father's untimely death this past August. After a year of isolation came death. Looking at the soil cradle that would forever now house my father made me look back. At my only-child-weekends spent at Lake Erie with my parents, on our Bayliner. Fishing. He taught me how to double-hook the line to catch twice as many perch and walleye. To make the anyways wait even more worth it. Swimming. He taught me how to float and to always look for shore. Hope, it is always there. And water skiing. He taught me to stand, always. Even when nothing is solid. Especially then. After the day had made Connect the Dots out of the knob of my face and the sun had fresh colored itself on my bangs, my parents and I would go grab dinner at a diner I cannot for the life of me recall. After a fish-n-chips dinner, they served pie to die for; his favorite was lemon meringue, topped with down inches thick. When the curves of the waves had romanced the yellow gone orange turned red enough for him to fall for it, we would walk next door and look at the Marblehead Lighthouse. We would watch the wet slick threaten to locket the day bit by bit until only a sliver was left. That piece, the final one between dark and light, is where I like to think my dad is now. Watching.

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THE LITTLE SEAHORSE IN ITS ENVIRONMENT

BY EMANUELA IORGA

Digital art

"This piece drew itself from one line to another. Suddenly, the Little Seahorse appeared out of nowhere, hijacking the space around it. This unexpected character kept popping up in my work, each time bringing new friends along. I care for them all and wait for them to arrive and brighten up my day."

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AURA

BY ZOE HUOT-LINK

Pencil, Japanese brush pen on watercolor paper

"In the Summer of 2021, I was in the process of creating a watercolor painting. This photo of that process sketch, "Aura", shows the intrigue of the creation process. The subject matter, hands painting a clay pot, reveals layers of art creation and inspiration. Hands are the magic behind all of this creation."

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POLARITY

BY MARK ROSALBO

House paint and texture on canvas 48" x 30"

"My mindset while painting 'Polarity' was to express the internal dialogue of self-reflection and personal judgment over a lifetime, a single day or a single moment. I have used house paint, various tools from my father, and textured canvases to give a physical manifestation for contemplation of this back-and-forth—this conversation with ourselves. My music (which can be listened to while viewing this piece by this link: https://soundcloud.com/user-827466570/reflection) captures the randomness of the emotions that are constantly flowing—we can’t control how they arise but we can control how we process them and if we are ready to let them go. 


In our fast-paced, meritocracy-based, increasingly-divided society, my imposter syndrome is masked by overconfident brushstrokes that can’t cover up a lack of confidence in the multiple layers of paint partially hidden under the surface. The endless inner turmoil that arises from feelings of self-doubt is expressed, at times, as geometric shapes woven together with texture, at other times, as seemingly random chaos running across the canvas—much like the constant ebb and flow of thoughts that consume our minds. These shapes and forms are both in and out of balance with contrasting colors, highlighting the roller coaster of these conflicting emotions and the intensity of introspection."

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SOUND COMING UNDONE

BY JACKIE LEISHMAN AND STEVEN L. PECK

Ink, acrylic, and collage on paper

"The world is collage to me. What happens at the edges and among the layers, where two different materials or ideas meet—that’s where I’m drawn. I have bins and bins of paper and scraps in my studio. It is important to my process that I not use virgin working materials but rather fragments of older work and found materials. Something from something. Beauty from ashes. It’s also important for me to show the sometimes-raw joints, the roughness of their coming together, to be candid about the process of layering and to leave the hand of the artist apparent. The push and pull between two ideas intrigue me most, the animating tensions between destruction and creation, expansion and contraction, and explosion and implosion. These ideas are embodied in the wilderness. The only constant in the wild is that it will change, that an element can and will be both violent and passive, opposites held in a balance. In a world that is increasingly contentious, the need to feel peace within the chaos becomes more desperate. By drawing, painting, and collaging, I seek to find an equivalent to the peace found in wild places."

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OCULOS TUOS APERI

BY ARIANA ESPINOZA

Ink and digital collage

"This piece is a mixture of pencil, pen, and digital art. I actually created this piece for one of my Honors classes last fall. The prompt was to show how the course had affected my life so far, and I realized that the class had 'opened my eyes' to a lot of new things. This is where the name 'Oculos Tuos Aperi' comes from actually, which is Latin for 'Open your eyes.'"

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QUARTET

BY ELLIOTT ORCHARD-BLOWEN

Collage and found poetry

This artist did not wish to include a description for their piece.

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NEON JOHN

BY JASON MONTGOMERY

Digitally altered mixed media collage on paper

Jason’s work engages the cross-section of Chicano/Indigenous identity, cultural hybridization, post-colonial reconstruction, and political agency. His writing and visual art bridge the aesthetics and feel from the early cubist collage movement and the Russian abstract movement of the 1920s with living and historical Native/Indigenous Californian and Chicano art traditions to explore the Post-colonial narrative through active synthesis and guided (re)construction.

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THE VOCABULARY OF WINTER

BY ZEE ZEE 

Digital portrait (drawing on photography), 11.7” x 16.5”

This artist did not wish to include a description for their piece.

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SHE'S TRAPPED

BY RW

Dried up ink, 4” x 6” notecard

"I made this piece with all my dried-out ink pens, scissors, a needle, and an old dollar store paintbrush. The red in the piece is 'her' and the green is supposed to look like fire. The purple colors are what make her trapped, so 'she' is trapped in the fire. If you look closely, you can see scratch marks on the notecard, which is 'her' scratching' a way out. (This was inspired by my cat scratching me on my knee as I was making this piece!) The white spaces are openings for viewers to 'enter' the art piece and find what they see. This piece can be interpreted in many different ways, which I did on purpose. There is an intended meaning, but the white spaces allow for lots of interpretations."

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MELANESIA

BY DAVID DASHARATH KALAL

Acrylic, india ink and acetate transfer on wood, 24” x 24”

"I am interested in the resilience of the image, in every story, if you go back, as far back as you can, to the point where every horizon disappears, you find an image. Resilience is at play in both the way images survive and push up through time and history and also in which images we create and display. In a larger historical temporality of expansion, exploration, and conquest the resilience of the image is an act of resistance.  In creating these images of people and places with deep and detailed stories, I often take them out into the world, quite literally plastering them onto construction sites, abandoned spaces, and other gaps in the built environment. I revisit them as they are transforming out in the world, often re-harvesting them, bringing them back into the studio, back home in a sense.  I work to build these pieces as palimpsests that embrace their failed erasures -- proceeding divergently, full of resilience, creating many possible associations and not converging into just the singular conclusion. Physically moving their imagery, texture, and color between and across different mediums - from digital to analog, paper, emulsion or acetate onwards onto canvas, wood or linen. When it works, I am producing painted things that contain their own archaeology and that shimmer with their own ghostwritten history."

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CATALOG OF SPARSE STARS

BY FEDERICO FEDERICI

Ink, Olivetti Studio 46 and
collage

This artist did not wish to include a description for their piece.

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TRYING TO BECOME

BY EDWARD MICHAEL SUPRANOWICZ

Digital drawing

This artist did not wish to include a description for their piece.

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FOREPLAY

BY MARK HURTUBISE

Photography

“Nature is resplendent with foreplay, especially during springtime. Hopefully, by pausing to view this blissful ritual in my “Foreplay” photograph, humans may be stimulated to sample its euphoria.”

 

Contact Information

Email:

Penumbra@csustan.edu


Address:
Penumbra
California State University Stanislaus
One University Circle
Turlock, California 95382

Building Location:
Demergasso-Bava Hall

Office Location:
DBH 304 (third floor)

Faculty Advisor:
Dr. Monica Flores

Co-Editors-in-Chief:
Jarred White
Hannah Neeley


Book Review Editor:
Autumn Andersen

Assistant Book Review Editor:

Essence Saunders

Art Coordinator: 

Andrea Wagner

Social Media Manager:

Jessica Charest